Category Archives: Events

Theater – The Pace Press – Pace University-NYC

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Movies – The Pace Press – Pace University-NYC

Before your roommate does get married, have him check his fiance’s credit history to make sure she is in good financial standing. And, after the wedding, you can encourage him to use online university directories to find information about online degrees, universities or research university programs in NYC. Pace Students visit lasik manhattan doctors when they want to understand the benefits and risks associated with lasik new york eye surgery.
This site is powered by: is a member of the Official Music Sponsor:

SOAR holds target prevention event for students – News – The Pace Press – Pace University-NYC

The University’s group Students Organized Against Rape (SOAR) held an event to raise self defense awareness on Oct. 5. It was led by martial arts expert and founder of the Female Awareness Self-Defense Class for Women, Gabrielle Rubin.
Rubin provided many useful tips to prevent an attack from ever happening. “It’s important to understand that attacks begin before anything physical happens,” she said.
According to Rubin, some of the most important ways in which an individual, male or female, may prevent being a target on the street begins with avoiding distractions. Avoid using cell phones or other electronic devices.
An attacker will notice if your eyes are down and all of your focus is on your phone or iPod. You will not hear an attacker coming if you are engaged in a conversation or have headphones on.
If you are out at night, try to have someone with you, especially if you are even slightly intoxicated. Always have at least one hand free and, if you can, one hand in a coat pocket.
It is good to have a free hand to defend yourself and leave the attacker in the dark about what you may have in your pocket to protect yourself. Try to condense bags so you are not carrying too much.
If you are lost, try not to project that to the people around you. Step aside to look at a map and figure out where you need to be. Using reflections in doors and storefronts is a good way to see who is around you. It will look like you are window-shopping.
If you get that eerie feeling that someone is behind you, it is best to give only one glance over the shoulder. Make sure you get a good look up and down and then continue on your way. Usually, people just want them to go away.
Rubin added some tips to make sure you do not look scared or like you are making any accusations. You can pretend to look past the person in question, perhaps “looking for a friend that you’re supposed to meet up with, project confidence. It is okay to be polite without inviting conversation.
“The best thing you can do to a bad guy is let them know ‘I see you,'” Rubin said.
In the event that someone does physically attack you, make sure you are prepared. Rubin recommends a few safety items to keep on your keychain. Pepper spray is a good long-distance weapon. If you are 18 or older, you can purchase pepper spray from your local pharmacy with no problems.
It is a good idea to do a test spray in an open area, so you know what to expect if you ever need to use it. Also, after spraying an attacker, do not stick around to see what happens.
An electronic personal alarm can be tripped or triggered with the touch of a button, emitting an extremely loud, high-pitched alarm. This will draw attention to your situation. A manual whistle has the same effect as the electronic alarm.
Kubotans are small steel rods, good for close up encounters. An LED light is a lot less aggressive, but will be helpful in warding away someone that gets too close.
Always remember, your keys should be in your pocket or very easily accessible to you at all times. Never have to fumble for your keys outside of your front door.
Rubin gave advice for New Yorkers geared towards students with a recent increase in attacks near the University.
If someone is coming at you quickly, get mad, not scared. Get an attitude and get loud. It is best to draw attention from the people around you and keep yelling. Non-verbal queues, like putting your hand up or pointing away send the message “Don’t come any closer.”
In elevators, stay near the buttons, so you are in control. If you feel that someone is following you to your floor, make any excuse to get out of the elevator.
When out at bars, Rubin recommends “keep it in the clear.” Try to stick to clear drinks and nothing shaken. This will make it easier to see if anything has been dropped in there that does not belong.
When in a taxi alone, call or text a friend the car number to ensure you get home safe. Even if you pretend to call someone, make sure the driver hears you tell “your over-protective friend,” your taxi number.
On a crowded subway, you can use non-verbal ways of letting someone know that an inappropriate touch is not okay. Swing your bag back to force someone away, give a foot stomp when the train jerks a little or a swift elbow can be used under the cover of a fake sneeze.
If the subway is not too crowded, but you feel threatened, sit next to someone or a group of people that you do not feel threatened by. Often, people are willing to chat if you explain that someone is making you uncomfortable.
A lot of the time an attacker may not be looking to harm you, but to take something. “Whatever they want can be replaced, you cannot,” Rubin said. If they demand something you have, throw it past them and run the other way. 

Self defense class held by SOAR teaches students physical protection – News – The Pace Press – Pace University-NYC

Students Organized Against Rape (SOAR) hosted Gabrielle Rubin at the University on Oct. 11 for a physical self-defense demonstration following her target prevention information session last week.
This time, Rubin demonstrated various ways in which individuals could react if an attack ever reached a physical level.
Rubin began with some simple strikes that would definitely cause some pain to an attacker.
A quick jab using the pointer and middle fingers together can be surprisingly effective when used in the eyes, throat or solar plexus. For example, if a male is wearing a button down shirt, the solar plexus is right where the fourth button would lie.
Try to remember that you do not have to put your hands in fists; you will risk hurting yourself just as much as you are hurting the attacker.
Another sensitive area that an attacker would not expect—a strike to the ear. Rubin likes to call this, the “bitch slap.” With a straight arm and a flat hand, this will really ring the attacker’s bell as the base of your palm strikes right at the temple. When using this strike, put your hip into it; this will allow your arm to reach further, keeping as much distance as possible between you and the attacker.
Using your hips to thrust your body forward, clench your fist and swing at a 45 degree angle, making contact with the meaty part of your arm. Arms are also a shield; when swinging with one arm, keep the other up to protect yourself.
Elbows are a strong part of the body to use in self-defense. The follow-through is important when using elbows. This will allow you to swing back with a second strike in the opposite direction if you have to. Always look where you are striking to ensure that contact is made.
The underside of the chin is a very soft area that you can also target when trying to fight off an attacker. Keeping a tight arm and tight fist, swing upwards in an “answering the phone” motion to hit your mark.
The most common attack is usually from behind. If this happens, tuck your chin into the inside of the attacker’s elbow so your airways are not cut off. Here, a foot stomp with the heel aimed right at the laces of the attacker’s shoes is very effective.
Rubin also demonstrated kicking defenses from the floor, should one find themselves thrown down. “Once people hit the ground they think the fight is over. I’m here to tell you it’s the safest place you can be,” she said. Keep your elbow and palm down as a sort of “kickstand” to support yourself.
Student responses about the event were positive. “I think it’s great to empower girls to protect themselves, especially in New York City where they may be more vulnerable,” senior Kathleen Black said.